History

 Aerial view of Bulls Eye CC and Tri City GC

Aerial view of Bulls Eye CC and Tri City GC

 
 Grand Old Men, 1959

Grand Old Men, 1959

 Golfing at Bulls Eye, 1932

Golfing at Bulls Eye, 1932

 

It all started in 1922...

Bulls Eye Country Club was built almost 100 years ago and has undergone few changes during that time. It always has offered a challenging golf course and a clubhouse where people could relax and visit.

The idea for a country club goes to George W. Mead, a founder of Consolidated Papers, and he was encouraged and assisted by John Alexander of Nekoosa Edwards Paper Company. They both thought it would be a great way to entertain out-of-town customers and businessmen from the area.

Mead owned about 100 acres of land on the Wisconsin River three miles south of the east side of Wisconsin Rapids. In the summer of 1922, he offered to lease the land for the country club. The site formerly was the farm of Ole Brahmstead.

The grounds were put into shape and a formal opening of the nine-hole golf course was Aug. 26, 1922. More than 200 area residents attended the opening dinner and social affair in the clubhouse. Alexander welcomed the members and their guests. Mead followed with a short speech about the origin of the idea.

Six decades later, on July 20th, 1983, an early morning fire destroyed the entire wood structure clubhouse. Makeshift facilities were set up in two mobile trailers to accommodate members. In October of 1983 ground was broken for a new clubhouse and construction was completed in May of 1984.

The present-day clubhouse can accommodate groups up to 240 guests for various banquets and special functions. A new dining room addition was dedicated on June 13th, 1990, made possible through the generosity of Emily Bell. The additional dining room is known as the “Emily Room.”

Many people have asked “where did Bulls Eye get its name?” (Contrary to popular belief, there is no affiliation to Bull’s Eye Credit Union.) Numerous stories and guesses have circulated over the years, but the true story dates back to when logging was prominent on the Wisconsin River. The site that the clubhouse sits on is known as the Bulls Eye Bend. Loggers would run logs down the river, day and night, to the sawmills. Once dark, the loggers would set a small lantern on the shore of the Bulls Eye Bend in order to have a place to aim the logs. If their aim was correct, the current of the water would naturally turn the logs past the bend and down the river. The loggers would call this action a “Bulls Eye”, thus the name Bulls Eye Country Club.

 
 Consolidated Papers, 1937

Consolidated Papers, 1937

 Aerial of Wisconsin Rapids

Aerial of Wisconsin Rapids

 Loggers

Loggers